2022 Global Hybrid Work Report

In 2021, we interviewed individuals from different cities around the world. We asked them questions regarding their experience and opinions about the new work models imposed during the pandemic.

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A breakdown of respondents is shown in the graph

Work Model as of Interview Date

Survey of Work Model

These individuals are composed of about:
· 30% hybrid workers who have varying on-site schedules
· 35% fully remote workers
· 35% on-site workers who are required to go to the office every day.

HybridWork

How many times do you go to the office?

Survey of Hybrid Work

Most of the respondents have identified their occupations for our interview purposes. None of our respondents had the exact job title apart from the two students. For the most part, hybrid and remote work are relatively new. Many have worked under the hybrid and remote work models only since the pandemic. however, a select few have been following hybrid/remote long before the pandemic even started.

*The diagram shows the number of days hybrid workers go to the office

List of the Respondents’ Occupations and Work Models

For those who have started working hybrid or remote only since the pandemic started.

Hybrid

Accountant

Accounting Analyst

Lawyer

Program Officer

Regional Business Director

Appliance Mechanic (19y)

Teleworker (16y)

Management Analyst

Director

For those that have been doing hybrid/remote for more than three years now; even before the pandemic started.

In-Person

Engineer

Executive Producer

Family Nurse Practitioner and Chiropractor

Lease Return Operator

Registered Dietician

Restaurant Service

Sales/Retail

Self-employed (undefined)

Service Industry

For those that did not specify when they have started hybrid working.

Remote

Professor of Chemical Engineering (prev. Acting Dean)

Senior Manager of Trust Funds

Student

Team Lead of Loan Processing Assistant

Directs web development projects (7y)

Life Coach (18y)

Merchant Coordinator (8y)

Street Photographer (9y)

What do Workers think of Hybrid/Remote Work?

When asked what they thought about hybrid working, the respondents had mixed opinions.

In the next three tables, you will see the positive and negative opinions they have to say regarding hybrid/remote work. The responses have been divided between the different work models.
"the only way l can do my job."
"I love my independence, the flexibility."
"Really comfortable with the setup."
"Same amount of work get done at home and in the office."
"Less commute."
"I am comfortable because l work from home."
"I have the opportunity to prepare more and use technologiesthat are beneficial to teaching."
Hybrid Workers
"Back hurts, eyes hurt, sick of the dining room table."
"I'm not learning a lot of new things because there's no challenge."
"It lacks the routine of going to the office and the social interaction that could give you new opportunities from those relationships."
"It's difficult to separate work hours from personal hours"
"It gets lonely when you're an outgoing person"
"Demands more of your time"
"the only way l can do my job."
"I love my independence, the flexibility."
"Really comfortable with the setup."
"Same amount of work get done at home and in the office."
"Less commute."
"I am comfortable because l work from home."
"I have the opportunity to prepare more and use technologiesthat are beneficial to teaching."
Remote Workers
"Back hurts, eyes hurt, sick of the dining room table."
"I'm not learning a lot of new things because there's no challenge."
"It lacks the routine of going to the office and the social interaction that could give you new opportunities from those relationships."
"I like remote but l also like going to the office once in a while to see your coworkers and its better to operate there."
"Revolutionized a lot of industries to adapt."
"Great idea. I think everybody should do it [if they can]."
"Enjoys it ...To take time off to take care of [daughter ] and go shopping."
"like it a lot, was hoping to doing it long term."
"[lt] can work very well depending on the field you're doing."
"I'd still want to work from home if i can."
On Site Workers
"For lazy people."
"You cant work with coworkers or see their faces."
"Need to wait hours for urgent messages."
"Promotes laziness and loneliness."
"Does not promote face to face communications."

Work Areas at Home

Many of our interviewed hybrid and remote workers have good experiences under their current work model. Many of these workers have now adapted to this schedule and have implemented changes to their homes. The results are presented on the right table. Many have opted for a sort of home office, especially those who can afford the space. However, others have opted for less “official” setups such as the kitchen table, the couch, etc.

With all these changes implemented, we wondered how they will feel if suddenly their company decides to go back to in-person work.

Dinner Table
Dedicated Desk
Home Office
Couch
Work areas at home
Any Quiet Space
Kitchen lsland
Community Room

So when asked “What will you do if your company cancels remote/hybrid work? This is what they have to say:

What will hybrid/remote
workers do if the company
returns to in-person working?
Look for another job
Will follow mandate
No answer

What will You do, if…

If we take into consideration the needs of the times, people are conflicted about the issue.

· On the one hand, you have the comfort and flexibility of working off-site.
· On the other hand, you need job security to live comfortably.

While many are confident in finding another job that offers working conditions that would suit them, many feel otherwise.

Video Conferencing Experience

Among the “new” technologies that became necessary during the pandemic are video conferencing and online collaboration. Although not all participants have given responses to this particular question, we can see that majority have had a certain degree of experience with video conferencing and collaboration. This data includes onsite workers. 68% participate in online meetings. The 6% who have never participated in video conferencing find it irrelevant to their jobs (e.g. executive producer-on site and appliance mechanic-hybrid). 26% were neutral or had no comment about joining video conferencing. However, some companies has this technology for its other departments. It can be inferred then that

Do you participate in online meetings or video conferencing?

Yes 68% No answer 26% No 6%

The Great Exodus

*the cells above shows the cities of origin of the interviewers and their relatives and friends *Below them are where those people have moved.

·Of these changes, perhaps the most drastic would be when people moved to a different city during the pandemic. Although none of our respondents are among those who have moved to live in a different place, many of them know people who do. ·Common denominators include warmer climates and cheaper costs of living. ·Florida came up many times. Not only because of the more comfortable temperatures. For some, they choose Florida because of the relaxed policies when it comes to COVID-19.

Prospect of Future Work/School Model

Conclusion

Hybrid work and remote work are here to stay.

Hybrid work and remote work are here to stay. A huge percentage of workers prefer them over traditional on-site work.Companies might see a shift in the workforce once COVID-19 restrictions are lifted and they decide to call back their employees to the office. Moving forward, we should continue to use the technology developed for collaboration. After almost two years of using them, it is clear that they promote productivity among employees. What needs to be focused upon moving forward is how to improve these technologies to cater to the changing needs of society. These would pertain to innovations that require less in-person contact and more immersive remote interactions. Many companies, including ours, are continuously developing innovations that would support the permanent changes made necessary by COVID-19.

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